TTA Insight: The Power of Justification

The Power of Justification

From violence to snapchat, misconduct requires justification. How does a person leave the norms of accepted behavior ending up entrenched in sexual misconduct, threats of violence, or worse?

Every problem comes with pain because pain (or the avoidance of it) seems to be the root of most our problems. But is pain abnormal? Does hurt, even if it is deep, cause us to spontaneously abandon the values that shape our lives? A wise friend once said, “The kind of person you are does not show itself during the easy times in your life. It is during the storm where the real you comes forth.”

Just the other day, I was turning a beautiful wooden bowl on the lathe. It was an intricate piece, covered with marvelous knots and grain patterns. As I was turning off the machine, the tool in my hand nicked the rotating bowls edge. The bowl, going at about 2250 RPM’s, immediately shattered. In an instant, several things passed across my mind. One involved throwing an item across my shop. Another involved a garbage can. Another involved wood glue, several clamps, and many days of unanticipated patience.

It is entirely normal for human beings to experience a problem, fantasize about solutions, effect an action plan, prepare for that plan, and then carry it out. In fact, if we didn’t have this problem-solving capability, we wouldn’t be able to remedy any of our problems!

Generally speaking, violence can be broken into two generic categories: Targeted aggression and reactive aggression. While both types can lead to critical violent moments, targeted aggression is by far the more dangerous in terms of active killers.

Why? Because action within goal-setting behavior requires justification. Reactive aggression is an un-thought out response. Targeted aggression comes from a very dangerous cycle of events, demonstrated below.

Generally speaking, violence can be broken into two generic categories: Targeted aggression and reactive aggression. While both types can lead to critical violent moments, targeted aggression is by far the more dangerous in terms of active killers.

Why? Because action within goal-setting behavior requires justification. Reactive aggression is an un-thought out response. Targeted aggression comes from a very dangerous cycle of events, demonstrated above.

Whether we’re talking about turning a wooden bowl, an intimidated student trying to regain control or a person trying to be sexually accepted, the cycle of behavior starts with the justification process.

When I started studying justification, I was startled by how much of it I recognized in my own life. I’ve caught myself driving home from work fantasizing about a conversation I might have with a neighbor, my spouse, or a co-worker. I’ve been shocked to find myself planning how to get what I need, even if it is merely a pre-thought out comment to get an edge in an argument.

I’m sure you’ve never done anything like that.

It is amazing to me just how quickly small mole hills can turn into mountains when we get focused on a smaller vision. All of us attempt to justify the means of our actions, even if that justification is simply, “I don’t care anymore.” If a person does not perceive options to exist or if clear boundaries and consequences aren’t in place, extreme justification becomes easier. If ability exists, extreme justification results in a higher likelihood of extreme action.

The take-away? Build healthy relationships, even if you have to go the extra mile. Cultivate options, even if its difficult to do so. And set clear boundaries and consequences to mitigate extreme justification.

Ask the Experts

Q: How can I monitor my child’s Snapchat and Instagram accounts for misconduct?

A: Parents can download a monitoring app like Netsanity. This particular app can block apps, filter content, disable internet access during certain times, and more. Remember, healthy boundaries and consequences must be in place for anything to work!

Send in your questions or sign up for our monthly insights: info@training-academy.org

Featured Posts
Recent Posts
Archive
Search By Tags
Follow Us
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Amazon Social Icon